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Ideal
Toylines
Toylines (alphabetical order)
= Miscellanious Playsets = (1965)
= Various toys from the 50s and 60s = (1965)
Captain Action (1966)
Chipettes (1988)
Chipmunks, The (1988)
Derry Daring (1975)
Dorothy Hamil (1977)
Electroman (1977)
Evel Knievel (1973)
J.J.Armes (1976)
Manglors (1983)
Robo Force (1982)
Shirley Temple (1980)
Star Team (1978)
Super Queens (1967)
Team America (1982)
Tiffany Taylor (1975)
Tuesday Taylor (1977)
Zeroids (1968)
Toylines (chronological order)
1965 = Miscellanious Playsets =
1965 = Various toys from the 50s and 60s =
1966 Captain Action
1967 Super Queens
1968 Zeroids
1973 Evel Knievel
1975 Derry Daring
1975 Tiffany Taylor
1976 J.J.Armes
1977 Dorothy Hamil
1977 Electroman
1977 Tuesday Taylor
1978 Star Team
1980 Shirley Temple
1982 Robo Force
1982 Team America
1983 Manglors
1988 Chipettes
1988 Chipmunks, The
Company history
About Ideal    
Rose Michtom and her husband Morris started out making teddy bears which they sold in their novelty and stationer's shop in New York. In 1903 they established Ideal Novelty & Toy Company. Morris Michtom, the founder of Ideal, died in 1938. His son Benjamin took over the company, and renamed it the "Ideal Toy Corporation". In 1982 the company was bought by CBS-Toys and doesn't make Teddy Bears anymore. The Ideal Toy Corporation had a long and illustrious career in the doll business, and was a major force in fashion dolls in the fifties and sixties. Ideal was in the forefront of new technology in producing their dolls. Materials ranged from cloth, celluloid, composition, hard rubber, latex "magic skin", hard plastic, injection-molded vinyl, rotation-molded vinyl, and blow-molded vinyl. Ideal holds dozens of patents for innovations such as flirty eyes, "mama" voice boxes, "magic skin", and the blow-molded vinyl techniques.
Origins of Company    
The Ideal Novelty and Toy Co. can trace its origins to Morris and Rose Michtom. The year was 1903.

This enterprising couple owned a penny candy store in Brooklyn and they were so enthralled by the story of Theodore Roosevelt’s refusal to kill a bear cub tied to a tree that they created a stuffed bear made from plush velvet with shoe-button eyes. They put it in the window of their store with a sign that read “Teddy’s Bear,” and it was an immediate sensation.

Customers wanted to buy it and Rose Michtom sewed and sewed but could not keep up with the demand. This was the birth of the “Teddy Bear” and led to the creation of the Ideal Toy and Novelty Co. in 1907. It became the Ideal Toy Co. in 1938.

Over the years, Ideal has delighted children with a myriad of toys such as “Rock’em Sock’em Robots” and “Mouse Trap,” but they are perhaps most famous for their dolls, which include “Buster Brown,” “Peter Pan,” “Betsy Wetsy,” “Deanne Durbin” and, perhaps most famous of all, “Shirley Temple.”
From the News Archive
Ideal 1956 Revlon fashion dolls

DEAR HELAINE AND JOE: Enclosed are pictures of a doll from my childhood. It is an original “Revlon” doll from about 1956. It is in good condition and has the original hangtag. Any information you could give me regarding the history and value of this doll would be appreciated. DEAR J.B.: The Ideal Novelty and Toy Co. can trace its origins to Morris and Rose Michtom. The year was 1903. This enterprising couple owned a penny candy store in Brooklyn and they were so enthralled by the story of Theodore Roosevelt’s refusal to kill a bear cub tied to a tree that they created a stuffed bear made from plush velvet with shoe-button eyes. They put it in the window of their store with a sign that read “Teddy’s Bear,” and it was an immediate sensation. Customers wanted to buy it and Rose Michtom sewed and sewed but could not keep up with the demand. This was the birth of the “Teddy Bear” and led to the creation of the Ideal Toy and Novelty Co. in 1907. It became the Ideal Toy Co. in 1938. Over the years, Ideal has delighted children with a myriad of toys such as “Rock’em Sock’em Robots” and “Mouse Trap,” but they are perhaps most famous for their dolls, which include “Buster Brown,” “Peter Pan,” “Betsy Wetsy,” “Deanne Durbin” and, perhaps most famous of all, “Shirley Temple.” Ideal started producing “Miss Revlon” dolls in 1956 and continued until 1959. These were first of the 1950s fashion dolls and they came with a variety of costumes — many of which had such things as faux pearl necklaces and rabbit-fur stoles. Originally there was a tag sewn in the front waistband of the garment stating that it was a “Revlon” doll, but many mothers clipped this tag off because it tended to ruin the fashion effect of the doll. There was also a “Little Miss Revlon” that was smaller than the “Miss Revlon” dolls, and these were made between 1958 and 1960. The “Miss Revlon” dolls were made in various sizes including 15-, 18-, 20-, 23- and 26-inch models. “Little Miss Revlon” was smaller at approximately 10½ inches tall. These dolls were marked “VT” followed by the doll’s size, such as “VT18” or “VT20” (the “V,” incidentally, stands for “vinyl”). The value of these dolls depends on the size, the condition and whether the original box has survived. The example belonging to J.B. appears to be in wonderful shape — the dress looks crisp and clean, the shoes are original and the original hang tag is still present. Since we do not know the size of this doll, we can only give J.B. a range of values. There was a time when Miss Revlon dolls in pristine condition retailed in the $250 to $700 range, with the 20- and 23-inch sizes being the most valuable, but we feel that prices on these dolls have softened a bit in recent years. Right now, we have found listings from retail purveyors on the Internet for similar VT18 or VT20 Miss Revlon dolls selling in the $250 to $300 range, and we feel that the current insurance replacement value for the example in today’s question is probably in the same neighborhood.
 
Posted 11/17/2007
Feb 2007 Toys in the workplace ideal for stress relief, creativity boosters - Monitor

Toys in the workplace ideal for stress relief, creativity boosters
Monitor, TX -
 
An office replete with pinstripe suits and company memos hardly seems like the place for a bobble head doll.
Yet, more and more, that’s exactly where you’ll find them, along with Silly Putty, magnetic sculptures, foam dart guns and a Slinky or two.
While the corporate world hasn’t linked forces with Toys R Us, managers and workers are realizing toys in the office can benefit everyone in positive ways, from boosting troop morale to inspiring creativity. Guadalupe Rodriguez, who works in an engineering office in Hidalgo, is a comic book fan who keeps his office stocked with action figures. When people visit his office, they occasionally play with a figurine, he said, and the toys make the office atmosphere lighter.
'You don’t want to walk into an office and it has white walls all around,' he said. 'People ask me, ‘Hey, why do you have so many toys?’ and I say, ‘Hey, it’s not dull.’ I actually took them down for a little to clean, and I thought, ‘I need to put those back up.'
According to Christopher Avery, author of Teamwork Is an Individual Skill and expert on office productivity, some large corporations intentionally keep toys on retainer to make their employees happy.
'They are immensely popular,' he said. 'They are so popular that some places have graduated them to an art form and policy. Google is known for having rooms full of pinball machines and foosball tables and pool tables. Lots of software engineering companies have ping-pong tables in the hallways. They believe that those folks are pretty well self-motivated, and that playing together is collaboration. They’re not blowing (work) off, they’re thinking about their problem and trying to solve it.'
One of the most important elements of the office toy is its ability to connect with people and inspire dialogue, Avery said.
'Sometimes if you engage in something like a toy it’s a release for your mind to think or be creative or relieve stress,' he said. 'It’s a variety of things. If someone comes into your office to talk to you, you can engage them over the toy.'
Toys have a great social allure, said Bill Ross, founder of the office toy retailer officeplayground.com. Having them can make your company look good to prospective clients.
'What kind of company do you want to do business with, a company that’s all black and white, or a company that has pens in the shape of a carrot?' he said. 'Stuff like that people like. There’s character and confidence in a company that’s willing to play that way.'
Toys also can be used to dispel tension in an office or meeting setting, Avery said. For instance, stuffed animals in a meeting can help people indirectly convey frustration.
Posted 2/10/2007
Ideal 1991 Baby BOGLINS
  FIGURA BABY BOGLINS BOINK AÑO 1991

FIGURA BABY BOGLINS BOINK AÑO 1991 

src=http://www.todocoleccion.net/images_tc/vent_mm.gif  6,00 EUR
Posted 2/2/2007
Ideal 1991 Baby Boglins Boink
  3872546
FIGURA BABY BOGLINS BOINK AÑO 1991

FIGURA BABY BOGLINS BOINK AÑO 1991 

src=http://www.todocoleccion.net/images_tc/vent_mm.gif  5,40 EUR
Posted 11/27/2006
Galoob/ Ideal 1997 ANASTASIA EN PARIS DE LA PELICULA ANASTASIA


  3648470
FIGURA ANASTASIA EN PARIS DE LA PELICULA ANASTASIA

FIGURA ANASTASIA EN PARIS DE LA PELICULA ANASTASIA 

src=http://www.todocoleccion.net/images_tc/vent_mm.gif  5,52 EUR
Posted 10/19/2006
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